Monday, April 27, 2015

Career Planning Dinners for Ph.D.s and Post Docs



Invitation to Career Planning Dinners

From Lee Huntsman, President Emeritus
 Matt O’Donnell, Dean Emeritus, College of Engineering

Application for Graduate Students/Post-Docs Actively Exploring Career Options

        We invite you to apply for participation in a series of four career discussion dinners for people actively exploring career options. Speakers will describe the key events or experiences that helped launch their careers and how they took advantage of opportunities when they arose. We will explore a wide range of career paths during these dinners that allow participants to actively gain greater awareness of career options that fit their individual and unique interests.  There will be significant time allocated for questions and discussion with each speaker.

        Since advanced degrees provide a deep foundation for subject matter competency, the career discussions will focus on the other ingredients of professional success that are common to most professional disciplines. The 45 selected participants will come from various departments throughout the university.

        We anticipate that participants will increase their confidence about vigorously pursuing the next step in their careers and develop a sharper eye for creating their own path.
       
        If you would like to be part of the four dinners (once per academic quarter over the next 12 months), please send the completed application to Rick Baugh, Ph.D. at cbaugh@crbaugh.com by Monday, May 18. If you have any questions, please contact Gordy Anderson at 206-714-5590 or Rick Baugh at 206-285-1932.

Opening: Rainy Dawg Technology Manager

TITLE: Rainy Dawg Technology Manager
CATEGORY: ASUW Services
REPORTS TO: Rainy Dawg General Manager
TERM: 31 Weeks
HOURS: 15 Hours/Week
PAY RATE: $756.00/Month

The Technology Manager is in charge of maintaining and updating the Rainy Dawg Radio  equipment.

The Technology Manager’s primary responsibility is to ensure that the station’s equipment is properly
functioning and to look into new technology that would benefit the station. They are also responsible
for maintaining and updating the station’s website in coordination with the ASUW Office of
Communications. They also work as the station’s live and recorded sound engineer.

JOB DESCRIPTION:
1. Manage the upkeep and repair of Rainy Dawg Radio equipment, either individually, or through
professionals.
2. Maintaining and update the station’s website, including any software updates.
3. Research and make recommendations for new technologies.
4. Execute management and setup of equipment check-out.
5. Lead the upkeep and maintenance of Rainy Dawg servers.
6. Ensure the maintenance of Rainy Dawg office and studio computers.
7. Retain knowledge on any developments in the many types of radio and computer equipment,
website design and creation, Linux server maintenance and security, Linux/Apache/MySQL/PHP
(LAMP) architecture, and various types of audio equipment and audio engineering principals.
8. Compile a 24-hour-a-day Emergency Contact list for DJs to call in case there are problems with
equipment or the broadcast stream.
9. Coordinate any repairs, new purchases, or replacements of station equipment.
10. Develop ideas for improving the station’s website to make it easier to navigate.
11. Run and coordinate sound for live, in-studio, and campus events.
12. Recording and facilitating of podcasts and advertisements.
13. Maintain and inform the ASUW Personnel Director and the Student Activities Office (SAO) adviser of all completed and missed office hours, including any absences due to sickness, personal
emergencies or work-related trips.
14. Meet with SAO adviser as needed and upon request, as well as participating in a quarterly
evaluation process.
15. Attend ASUW mandatory training sessions and staff meetings, including but not limited to the
ASUW Fall Orientation and ASUW Personnel meetings.
16. Review and adhere to conditions of employment as stated in the ASUW Personnel Policy, the signed ASUW Memorandum of Understanding and the Student Employment Handbooks. All actions must also follow the laws and procedures set by ASUW, SAO and the State of Washington.
17. Responsible for initiating a thorough transition with newly hired successor before finals week of
Spring Quarter to ensure continuity. Prepared documents, such as a transition binder/folder, are
recommended.

QUALIFICATIONS:
1. Ability to work independently.
2. Requires previous web design experience, and extensive knowledge of various radio, audio, and
computer products.
3. Experience with one or more of the following: Linux/UNIX, Apache, MySQL, PHP, PERL, or
Bash.
4. Ability to handle stress and a high degree of responsibility.
5. Able to identify, solve, and follow through on problems.
6. Prior experience working within a radio station preferred.
7. Prior experience with audio engineering preferred.
8. Ability to quickly and efficiently learn new technologies and adapt to new work flows.
9. Must be a UW student enrolled in at least 6 undergraduate or 4 graduate credits or on leave as
defined by Executive Order 50.

More information and the application is available through HuskyJobs and through jobs.asuw.org.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Job Opportunity with UW Student Calling Program

The Student Calling Program employees between 70 and 80 student callers, and 8 student managers. On a nightly basis (Saturday-Thursday) callers engage in quality conversations with alumni and work to acquire gifts to the university. This is a great job for students looking to increase many skills including but not limited to: verbal communication, sales experience, working as a team. However, we employ students from all different majors and interests across campus. Additionally, students have the opportunity to network with professional advancement staff, but they also get to enjoy flexible schedules and a fun, laid-back environment. 

http://depts.washington.edu/uwadv/central-resources/student-calling-program/

Fluke Networks Info/Recruiting Session: UW, April 28th

Tuesday, April 28 at 5:30pm in EE125

Computer Science, Computer Engineering, & Electrical Engineering students wanted for full-time, development-oriented positions.

Opportunities Include:
  • Client and server side web application development
  • Embedded software development
  • Mobile application development

Summer Quarter Business SUSTAINABILITY Courses

ESRM 320, Marketing and Management From a Sustainability Perspective (info below and more detailed info at https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/973108/assignments/syllabus)
ESRM 321, Finance and Accounting From a Sustainability Perspective (info below and more detailed info at https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/973109/assignments/syllabus)
 
Summer Term A ESRM 320 (SLN 11413) is a 100% online course (except for the in-person final exam on July 21), and there is an optional second in person class, on June 23, to meet face to face and to introduce the course.
Overview.
For-profit companies and non-profit organizations use marketing and human resources to create and deliver products, services, and ideas. This course explores: 1) business practices that are aligned with environmental stewardship and social responsibility standards; 2) the concepts and models of a market orientation; 3) how markets are researched and targeted, and products positioned, to meet consumer needs; 4) creating and pricing products, developing distribution channels, and implementing promotion campaigns; 5) managerial and leadership skills and styles; 6) how companies motivate employees and develop human capital; and 7) methods for recruiting, selecting, training, and evaluating employees. Sustainability refers to integrating environmental, social, and financial/economic elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations. This course explores the meaning and importance of sustainable business practices that respect and adhere to best environmental science methods and ethical social responsibility standards. The context for this exploration will be corporate sustainability reports.
 
Learning Objectives (at the end of this course, students should be able to do the following).
  1. Explain the vocabulary, concepts, and models of marketing, human resources, and sustainability
  2. Summarize how a market orientation and commitment to sustainability can enhance customer and employee satisfaction
  3. Describe how consumer markets are segmented, targeted, and products positioned to satisfy individual, government, and business consumers’ wants and needs
  4. Compare techniques for creating value-added products, services, and ideas; valuing environmental and social externalities and managing traditional pricing; developing distribution strategies and “greening” the supply chain; and creating and implementing promotion campaigns
  5. Define managerial and leadership styles and theories of motivation, persuasion, and influence
  6. Summarize the human resource process of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, motivating, and evaluating employees
  7. Describe sustainability reporting and the GRI indicators for measuring sustainability performance
  8. Assess real world sustainability performance using corporate sustainability reports and GRI indicators
  9. Analyze and interpret sustainability performance data
  10. Learn how to use Excel spreadsheets
Summer Term B ESRM 321 (SLN 11414) is a 100% online course (except for the in-person final exam on August 20), and there is an optional second in person class, on July 23, to meet face to face and to introduce the course.
Overview.
We explore two of the four primary business dimensions: finance and accounting. Finance refers to the flows and uses of money among individuals, businesses, non-profit organizations, and governments and associated processes, institutions, and markets. Accounting involves recording, classifying, summarizing, and interpreting business transactions to provide management and stakeholders with information about a company’s performance, liquidity, growth, value, etc. Sustainability. Refers to integrating environmental, social, and financial elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations. We will explore the meaning and importance of sustainable business practices that respect and adhere to best environmental science methods and ethical social responsibility standards. The context for this exploration will be corporate annual financial and sustainability reports.
 
Learning Objectives (at the end of this course, students should be able to do the following).
  1. Explain the vocabulary and concepts of finance, accounting, and sustainability
  2. Summarize what money is, counterfeiting deterrence, and financial institutions
  3. Explain the functions of the U.S. Federal Reserve Board and its monetary policy tools
  4. Describe stock markets and investing strategies
  5. Analyze financial statements (e.g., balance sheets, income statements)
  6. Define corporate financial management
  7. Summarize corporate social responsibility
  8. Describe sustainability reporting and the GRI indicators for measuring sustainability performance
  9. Assess real world sustainability performance using corporate sustainability reports and GRI indicators
  10. Analyze and interpret sustainability performance data
  11. Learn how to use Excel spreadsheets

Friday, April 17, 2015

Green Dot Bystander Training Sign-Up

Registration is now open for the next Green Dot Bystander Training onMay 16th. If you have not yet heard about Green Dot, it is a movement on campus focused on the prevention of sexual violence by training students on how to be active Bystanders, and you can find more information here:
http://depts.washington.edu/livewell/saris/green-dot/
To sign up you can head to the Green Dot Website seen above, or click directly on the link at the end of this message. As always, this training will include a free lunch along with a free UW T-shirt. Don't miss this great opportunity to learn valuable skills, boost your resume, and help your fellow Huskies stay safe.

EE539C: Advanced Topics in Solid State: Nanophotonics (SLN: 13414)

Course Instructor: Arka Majumdar (arka@uw.edu)
Course offered: Fall, 2015 (TTh 2:30-3:50pm; EEB 045)

Spanning the entire history of human civilization light has remained one of the most important media for information and knowledge transfer, starting with the lighting of fire to alert people of imminent danger in pre-historic era. Understanding the property and behavior of light is crucial for realms beyond just data and knowledge transfer. It is well-known that high speed internet, novel display, ubiquitous camera rely on photonic technologies. Apart from these, numerous other technologies like solar cell, bio- and chemical sensing and medical imaging depend heavily on optics.

Today, we are in a remarkable position to manipulate light in the most innovative manner. We have optical devices with nano-meter scale features, where the light propagation fundamentally changes. With nanoscale confinement of light, one can study quantum optics in solid state systems. This opens up advanced avenues of exploration for a variety of applications. These devices enable integrated photonics, novel quantum optics and new functionalities like negative refraction of light and superlensing. In this course, you will learn about such nanoscale photonic devices, via literature survey, problem solving and numerical simulations.
Prerequisite: Familiarity with electro-magnetics, and solid-state devices will be helpful, although the course is designed to be self-contained. Some MATLAB programming will be required for the class.

Feedback from last year:
This course made me realize how important it is to really think about how the application of the physics to a specific technology or device might change and if the application to that technology or device is even feasible.

The examples of practical challenges with designs and experiments. Discussing these topics was extremely interesting, as much of this is not clearly stated in literature. Except for courses like this, similar information is very difficult to find.